Cirquent calculus

Cirquent calculus is a proof calculus which manipulates graph-style constructs termed cirquents, as opposed to the traditional tree-style objects… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2006-2016
01220062016

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2017
2017
Cirquent calculus is a proof system manipulating circuit-style constructs rather than formulas. Using it, this article constructs… (More)
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2016
2016
Cirquent calculus is a new proof-theoretic and semantic approach introduced by G.Japaridze for the needs of his theory of… (More)
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2014
2014
Introduced in 2006 by Japaridze, cirquent calculus is a refinement of sequent calculus. The advent of cirquent calculus arose… (More)
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2013
2013
This paper constructs a cirquent calculus system and proves its soundness and completeness with respect to the semantics of… (More)
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2013
2013
This paper constructs a cirquent calculus system and proves its soundness and completeness with respect to the semantics of… (More)
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2013
2013
This paper constructs a cirquent calculus system and proves its soundness and completeness with respect to the semantics of… (More)
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2012
2012
Computability logic is a formal theory of computability. The earlier article “Introduction to cirquent calculus and abstract… (More)
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2010
2010
Cirquent calculus is a recent approach to proof theory, whose characteristic feature is being based on circuit-style structures… (More)
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2008
2008
Cirquent calculus is a new proof-theoretic and semantic framework, whose main distinguishing feature is being based on circuit… (More)
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2006
2006
This paper introduces a refinement of the sequent calculus approach called cirquent calculus. Roughly speaking, the difference… (More)
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