Catha Plant

Known as: Catha, Cathas 
A plant genus of the family CELASTRACEAE. The leafy stems of khat are chewed by some individuals for stimulating effect. Members contain… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1957-2018
0102019572017

Papers overview

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2012
2012
BACKGROUND Use of psychoactive drugs such as khat leaves (Catha edulis) alter moods and emotional state and lead to adverse… (More)
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2008
2008
INTRODUCTION We assessed the prevalence of substance use and its association with high blood pressure among adults in Addis Ababa… (More)
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2004
2004
Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor (CRFR)-mediated activation of the ERKs 1/2-p42 and -44) has been reported for CRF… (More)
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2002
2002
In this study the short term (3 months) toxicological effects of varying levels of Catha edulis leaves were examined on the… (More)
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2002
2002
In this study the long term (6 months) toxicological effect of varying levels of Catha edulis leaves were examined on the plasma… (More)
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2002
2002
Fresh leaves from khat trees (Catha edulis Celestrasae) are chewed daily by over 20 million people in Yemen and East African… (More)
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2001
2001
We used the micronucleus (MN) test to determine the genetic damage caused by khat, a widely consumed psychostimulant plant, in… (More)
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1996
1996
The chewing of fresh leaves of the khat bush (Catha edulis) is common in certain countries of East Africa and the Arab peninsula… (More)
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1995
1995
BACKGROUND The leaves of Khat are chewed for their central stimulant effect, but their use may cause anorexia and constipation… (More)
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Highly Cited
1976
Highly Cited
1976
Catha edulis, or khat, a plant indigenous to Yemen, Ethiopia, and East Africa, has sympathomimetic and euphoriant effects. Its… (More)
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