CNST gene

Known as: protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 64, CNST, FLJ32001 
 

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1987-2017
0519872017

Papers overview

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2015
2015
BACKGROUND Time trends in cancer incidence rates (IR) are important to measure the changing burden of cancer on a population over… (More)
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2010
2010
Since 1992, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that women of childbearing age consume 400 µg of folic acid… (More)
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2009
2009
Asparaginase (ASP) therapy is associated with depletion of antithrombin (AT) and fibrinogen (FG). Potential toxicities include… (More)
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2008
2008
Since high levels of prions, the causative agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), accumulate in the brain and spinal… (More)
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2007
2007
Beef carcasses were examined to explore the effects of stunning methods on central nervous system tissue (CNST) dissemination on… (More)
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2007
2007
  • Susan H Winn
  • Best practice & research. Clinical obstetrics…
  • 2007
The Clinical Negligence Scheme for Trusts (CNST) provides NHS trusts with a set of risk management standards for maternity… (More)
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2006
2006
Three hundred meat samples, recovered from beef neck- and breast-bones using a conventional advanced meat recovery (AMR) system… (More)
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2005
2005
Shoulder dystocia 'skill drills' are a requirement for the Maternity CNST standards. However, there is, as yet, no evidence that… (More)
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2003
2003
In the current climate of rising caesarean section rates coupled with the increasingly litigious nature of modern medical… (More)
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1997
1997
The Clinical Negligence Scheme for Trusts (CNST) is a mutual pooling pay-as-you-go arrangement for NHS trusts in England… (More)
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