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CCR5 protein, human

Known as: Chemokine (C-C) Receptor 5, C-C Chemokine Receptor Type 5, CCR5 
C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (352 aa, ~41 kDa) is encoded by the human CCR5 gene. This protein is involved in the modulation of inflammatory… Expand
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Objective—Chemokines and their receptors are crucially involved in the development of atherosclerotic lesions by directing… Expand
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
The release of microparticles from eukaryotic cells is a well-recognized phenomenon. We demonstrate here that the chemokine… Expand
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
ABSTRACT It has been proposed that changes in cell surface concentrations of coreceptors may control infections by human… Expand
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
BACKGROUND The rate of progression to AIDS varies among individuals infected with HIV-1. Factors responsible include two… Expand
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
The chemokine receptor 5 (CKR5) protein serves as a secondary receptor on CD4+ T lymphocytes for certain strains of human… Expand
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Rare individuals have been multiply exposed to HIV-1 but remain uninfected. The CD4+ T-cells of two of these individuals… Expand
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Entry of HIV-1 into target cells requires cell-surface CD4 and additional host cell cofactors. A cofactor required for infection… Expand
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
HIV-1 and related viruses require co-receptors, in addition to CD4, to infect target cells. The chemokine receptor CCR-5 (ref. 1… Expand
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
The β-chemokines MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES inhibit infection of CD4+ cells by primary, non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) HIV-1 strains… Expand
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Here, we show that the beta-chemokine receptor CKR-5 serves as a cofactor for M-tropic HIV viruses. Expression of CKR-5 with CD4… Expand
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