CALM1 wt Allele

Known as: PHKD Gene, CALML2, DD132 Gene 
Human CALM1 wild-type allele is located within 14q24-q31 and is approximately 11 kb in length. This allele, which encodes calmodulin protein, is… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1996-2018
012319962018

Papers overview

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2018
2018
This article applies under-utilized research in economic sociology to illuminate an important yet overlooked aspect of relational… (More)
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2016
2016
AIM To evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention for reducing social stigma towards mental illness in adolescents. The effect… (More)
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2012
2012
The capacity of white-rot fungi to degrade wood lignin may be highly applicable to the development of novel bioreactor systems… (More)
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2008
2008
PURPOSE Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by focal areas of loss of articular cartilage in synovial joints, associated with… (More)
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2007
2007
The present paper is grounded on the premise that emotions are an essential component of self development as they simultaneously… (More)
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2004
2004
Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential component of calcium signaling in multicellular organisms. We used null mutations of the… (More)
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2000
2000
Previous studies have shown that the expression of the cell-cell adhesion molecule (C-CAM1), located at chromosome 19, is down… (More)
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1999
1999
BACKGROUND Recently, we demonstrated that expression of C-CAM1, an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like cell adhesion molecule (CAM), was… (More)
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1999
1999
Studies in rat prostate and liver have suggested that C-CAM1 is involved in the formation and maintenance of histotypic… (More)
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1996
1996
C-CAM is a Ca(2+)-independent cell adhesion molecule (CAM) belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Addition of chemical… (More)
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