Born rule

Known as: Born Law, Born's Law, Born's rule 
The Born rule (also called the Born law, Born's rule, or Born's law) is a law of quantum mechanics which gives the probability that a measurement on… (More)
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2015
2015
The black hole information problem has motivated many proposals for new physics. One idea, known as state-dependence, is that… (More)
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2014
2014
We provide a derivation of the Born Rule in the context of the Everett (ManyWorlds) approach to quantum mechanics. Our argument… (More)
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2012
2012
Topos approaches to quantum foundations are described in a u nified way by means of spectral bundles, where the base space is a… (More)
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2009
2009
In this paper we will analyze discrete probabili ty distributions in which probabilities of particular outcomes of some experi m… (More)
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2008
2008
We clarify the role of the Born rule in the Copenhagen Interpretation of quantum mechanics by deriving it from Bohr’s doctrine of… (More)
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2007
2007
  • 2007
The Born rule provides a link between the mathematical formalism of quantum theory and experiment, and as such is almost single… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
We study the connection between atomistic and continuum models for the elastic deformation of crystalline solids at zero… (More)
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2006
2006
Considerable effort has been devoted to deriving the Born rule i.e., that x 2dx is the probability of finding a system, described… (More)
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2004
2004
In Quantum Mechanics the transition from a deterministic description to a probabilistic one is done using a simple rule termed… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
The Cauchy-Born rule postulates that when a monatomic crystal is subjected to a small linear displacement of its boundary, then… (More)
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