Benson's algorithm

Benson's algorithm, named after Harold Benson, is a method for solving linear multi-objective optimization problems. This works by finding the… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

2000-2017
012320002017

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2017
2017
In this paper, a parametric simplex algorithm for solving linear vector optimization problems (LVOPs) is presented. This… (More)
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Review
2017
Review
2017
Bensolve is an open source implementation of Benson’s algorithm and its dual variant. Both algorithms compute primal and dual… (More)
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2017
2017
The following special case of the classical NP-hard scheduling problem 1|r j |Lmax is considered. There is a set of jobs N = {1… (More)
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2016
2016
Mapping the structure of the entropy region in higher dimensions is an important open problem, as even partial knowledge about… (More)
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2015
2015
Multiplicative programming problems (MPPs) are global optimisation problems known to be NP-hard. In this paper, we employ… (More)
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2008
2008
In this paper we propose a modification of Benson’s algorithm for solving multiobjective linear programmes in objective space in… (More)
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2008
2008
The geometric duality theory of Heyde and Löhne (2006) defines a dual to a multiple objective linear programme (MOLP). In… (More)
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2000
2000
This article presents the latest experimental results of the European DISS (DIrect Solar Steam) project. The experiments are… (More)
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