Bactrocera yoshimotoi

Known as: Bactrocera (Bactrocera) yoshimotoi 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1994-2018
010203019942018

Papers overview

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2012
2012
The fruit fly Bactrocera oleae is the primary biotic stressor of cultivated olives, causing direct and indirect damages that… (More)
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2010
2010
Two correlative approaches to the challenge of ecological niche modeling (genetic algorithm, maximum entropy) were used to… (More)
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2009
2009
Following cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques, we investigated the microbiota associated with Bactrocera oleae, one… (More)
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2009
2009
As polyphagous, holometabolous insects, tephritid fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) provide a unique habitat for endosymbiotic… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Transformer (tra) is the second gene of a regulatory cascade based on RNA splicing that determines sex in Drosophila melanogaster… (More)
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2007
2007
The complete mitochondrial genome of the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. has been sequenced, and is here described… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
The olive fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the major pest of olives in most commercial olive-growing regions worldwide. The species is… (More)
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2005
2005
The taxonomic identity of the hereditary prokaryotic symbiont of the olive fly Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae) was… (More)
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2004
2004
The attraction of female and male Bactrocera papayae to conspecific males fed with methyl eugenol (ME) and female attraction to… (More)
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1998
1998
The Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni, like the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, has a diploid complement of 12… (More)
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