Automated proof checking

Known as: Automated theorem checker, Automated proof verifier, Automated proof verifiicator 
Automated proof checking is the process of using software for checking proofs for correctness. It is one of the most developed fields in automated… (More)
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Papers overview

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2013
2013
Mathematical rigor is an essential concept to learn in the study of computer science. In the process of learning to write math… (More)
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2013
2013
Producing and checking proofs from SMT solvers is currently the most feasible method for achieving high confidence in the… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
We have designed and implemented a general and powerful distributed authentication framework based on higher-order logic… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
The construction of abstractions is essential for reducing large or innnite state systems to small or nite state systems. Boolean… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
PVS (Prototype Verification System) is an environment for constructing clear and precise specifications and for developing… (More)
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Review
1996
Review
1996
This paper describes a mechanism by which an oper ating system kernel can determine with certainty that it is safe to execute a… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1995
Highly Cited
1995
Although automated proof checking tools for general-purpose logics have been successfully employed in the veriication of digital… (More)
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Highly Cited
1991
Highly Cited
1991
The technique of proof plans is explained. This technique is used to guide automatic inference in order to avoid a combinatorial… (More)
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Review
1988
Review
1988
Different techniques of automated formal reasoning are described and their performance and requirements on the human user are… (More)
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