Asphondylia benedicta

Known as: Asphondylia sp. PK77 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2003-2017
0120032017

Papers overview

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2018
2018
The soybean pod gall midge, Asphondylia yushimai, is known to utilize Laurocerasus zippeliana (Rosaceae) and Osmanthus… (More)
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2017
2017
We report on Asphondylia poss. swaedicola Kieffer & Jörgensen inducing apical stem galls on Suaeda divaricata Moquin-Tandon in… (More)
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Review
2014
Review
2014
Numerous species of gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) have been recorded from saltbush (Chenopodiaceae: Atriplex) around the… (More)
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2013
2013
Sigmophora tricolor (Ashmead) and Sigmophora sayatamabae (Ishii) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) were resurrected from Sigmophora… (More)
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2009
2009
Many insect herbivores can only use hosts during a specific phenological stage, i.e., a phenological window. Previous studies… (More)
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2006
2006
The population dynamics of the aucuba fruit midge,Asphondylia aucubae (Japanese name: Aokimitamabae), were studied for 3 yr… (More)
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2003
2003
The soybean pod gall midge is an important pest of soybean in Japan and is known to occur also in Indonesia and China. This gall… (More)
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