Asclepias gibba

Known as: Asclepias gibba Schltr. 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1958-2017
024619582017

Papers overview

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2012
2012
Wetland plants are being used successfully for the phytoremediation of trace elements in natural and constructed wetlands. Under… (More)
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2010
2010
To assess the tolerance and phytoaccumulation ability of the duckweed Lemna gibba L. to copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni), the aquatic… (More)
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2005
2005
Cyanotoxins are a group of compounds produced by cyanobacteria that can have severe physiological effects on other organisms… (More)
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2005
2005
Enzyme electrophoresis was employed to assess genetic diversity within and divergence between Lemna disperma and Lemna gibba… (More)
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2004
2004
Constructed wetlands are well known as highly efficient system to treat wastewater from different sources. This treatment system… (More)
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2003
2003
Dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a haloacetic acid, is a common contaminant of aquatic ecosystems. A study to investigate potential… (More)
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1999
1999
The toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAs) is known to be enhanced by light via photosensitization reactions… (More)
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1998
1998
Two important signaling systems involved in the growth and development of plants, those triggered by the photoreceptor… (More)
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Highly Cited
1990
Highly Cited
1990
Lemna gibba L. B3 was grown under heterotrophic, photoheterotrophic, and autotrophic conditions in water having a variety of… (More)
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1980
1980
Placing light-grown Lemna gibba L. G-3 into the dark results in a changed pattern of protein synthesis. Although the amount of… (More)
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