Arithmetic combinatorics

Known as: Additive combinatorics, Multiplicative combinatorics 
In mathematics, arithmetic combinatorics is a field in the intersection of number theory, combinatorics, ergodic theory and harmonic analysis.
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2015
2015
We present a collection of new results on problems related to 3SUM, including: The first truly subquadratic algorithm for… (More)
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2014
2014
In this paper we characterize real bivariate polynomials which have a small range over large Cartesian products. We show that for… (More)
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2014
2014
The success of the compressed sensing paradigm has shown that a substantial reduction in sampling and storage complexity can be… (More)
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Review
2014
Review
2014
Arithmetic combinatorics is often concerned with the problem of controlling the possible range of behaviours of arbitrary finite… (More)
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Highly Cited
2013
Highly Cited
2013
Non-malleable codes provide a useful and meaningful security guarantee in situations where traditional errorcorrection (and even… (More)
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2010
2010
Given a finite field Fp = {0, . . . , p − 1} of p elements, where p is a prime, we consider the distribution of elements in the… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
The degrees-of-freedom of a K-user Gaussian interference channel (GIFC) has been defined to be the multiple of (1/2) log2 P at… (More)
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2008
2008
We show that every bounded function g: {0,1}^n -≫ [0,1] admits an efficiently computable "simulator" function h: {0,1}^n-≫[0,1… (More)
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Review
2006
Review
2006
Arithmetic combinatorics, or additive combinatorics, is a fast developing area of research combining elements of number theory… (More)
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2006
2006
Shortly after Szemerédi’s proof that a set of positive upper density contains arbitrarily long arithmetic progressions… (More)
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