Aniseikonia

Known as: Aniseikonia [Disease/Finding] 
A condition in which the ocular image of an object as seen by one eye differs in size and shape from that seen by the other.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2005
2005
AIMS To determine whether the computerised version of the new aniseikonia test (NAT) is a valid, reliable method to measure… (More)
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2004
2004
PURPOSE To study the effect on binocular contrast sensitivity and binocular summation of aniseikonia induced by size (afocal… (More)
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1992
1992
PURPOSE To evaluate the efficacy of intraocular lens (IOL) implant procedures, analyzing visual function of the operated eyes and… (More)
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1992
1992
The New Aniseikonia Test (NAT), a hand-held direct-comparison test using red/green anaglyphs, has several potential advantages as… (More)
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1986
1986
The pattern reversal visual evoked response (VER) was recorded under conditions of artificially unbalanced visual input between… (More)
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1985
1985
The sensitivity of clinical measures of stereoacuity in the detection of interocular differences in retinal images was examined… (More)
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1983
1983
Interocular differences in apparent size (aniseikonia) are typically associated with interocular differences in refractive error… (More)
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Highly Cited
1981
Highly Cited
1981
Contrast sensitivity functions were measured for sinusoidal gratings from a sample of 10 anisometropic amblyopes. A high spatial… (More)
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1980
1980
Random Dot Stereograms (RDS) are useful, but are sometimes misleading in assessing the degree of binocular cooperation in the… (More)
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Highly Cited
1976
Highly Cited
1976
If a binocular observer looks at surfaces, the disparity is a continuous vector field defined on the manifold of cyclopean visual… (More)
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