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Ambrosiella <Microascaceae>

Known as: Ambrosiella 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2019
2019
Thousands of species of ambrosia beetles excavate tunnels in wood to farm fungi. They maintain associations with particular… Expand
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2018
2018
Significance Ambrosia beetles are among the true fungus-farming insects and cultivate fungal gardens on which the larvae and… Expand
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Highly Cited
2015
Highly Cited
2015
The genus Ambrosiella accommodates species of Ceratocystidaceae (Microascales) that are obligate, mutualistic symbionts of… Expand
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2015
2015
In nearly every forest habitat, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae, Platypodinae) plant and maintain… Expand
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2014
2014
Isolations from the granulate ambrosia beetle, Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae: Xyleborini… Expand
Highly Cited
2014
Highly Cited
2014
The genus Ceratocystis was established in 1890 and accommodates many important fungi. These include serious plant pathogens… Expand
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Most 'ambrosia' fungi are members of a heterogeneous group of ophiostomatoids that includes the anamorph genera Ambrosiella… Expand
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
ABSTRACT The pathogenicity of two isolates of each of four bark beetle-associated blue-stain fungi was evaluated after mass… Expand
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