All-or-nothing transform

Known as: All or nothing protocol, All-or-nothing protocol, Aont 
In cryptography, an all-or-nothing transform (AONT), also known as an all-or-nothing protocol, is an encryption mode which allows the data to be… (More)
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Papers overview

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2018
2018
This paper presents the selective all-or-nothing transform (SAONT). It addresses the needs of users who would like to use… (More)
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2015
2015
We continue a study of unconditionally secure all-or-nothing transforms (AONT) begun by Stinson (2001). An AONT is a bijective… (More)
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2010
2010
Ensuring the security of RFID's large-capacity database system by depending only on existing encryption schemes is unrealistic… (More)
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2009
2009
A multi-stage secret sharing (MSS) scheme is a method of sharing a number of secrets among a set of participants, such that any… (More)
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2007
2007
All-Or-Nothing (AON) is an encryption mode for block ciphers with the property that an adversary must decrypt the entire… (More)
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2005
2005
When a hard drive (HDD) is recycled, it is recommended that all files on the HDD are repeatedly overwritten with random strings… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
We study the problem of partial key exposure. Standard cryptographic definitions and constructions do not guarantee any security… (More)
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2000
2000
We propose two new Remotely Keyed Encryption protocols; a length-increasing RKE and a length-preserving RKE. The proposed… (More)
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2000
2000
This thesis provides a formal analysis of two kinds of cryptographic objects that used to be treated with much less rigor: All-or… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
This paper studies All-or-Nothing Transforms (AONTs). which have been proposed by Rivest as a mode of operation for block ciphers… (More)
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