Agapornis

Known as: Lovebird, Lovebirds 
A genus comprised of nine species of small PARROTS from Africa. They are noted for showing affection for their mates.

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1967-2017
024619672017

Papers overview

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2010
2010
In the present study, Cryptosporidium oocysts were found, by light microscopy, in 37 fecal samples of peach-faced lovebirds… (More)
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1999
1999
To determine if different pathotypes of the avian polyomavirus (APV) exist and to compare the genomes of APVs originating from… (More)
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1998
1998
We conducted two-dimensional (2D) discrete Fourier analyses of the spatial variation in refractive index of the spongy medullary… (More)
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1997
1997
An outbreak of avian polyomavirus infection is reported in a group of six wild-caught red-faced lovebirds (Agapornis pullaria… (More)
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1986
1986
The body temperature (Tb) of brooded Agapornis nestlings increased with age from 36.2 on the day of hatching to 38.9 degrees C on… (More)
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1986
1986
In a naturally occurring outbreak in which all clinically affected birds died, microsporidian infection was confirmed by… (More)
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1984
1984
Psittacine beak and feather disease is characterised by loss of feathers, abnormally shaped feathers and overgrowth and… (More)
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1978
1978
A microsporidian infection was diagnosed in a pied peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis) which had died after an illness… (More)
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1975
1975
A microsporidan tentatively classified as Encephalitozoon sp. on the basis of structure and tinctorial qualities was identified… (More)
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1971
1971
  • Jan Dyck
  • Zeitschrift für Zellforschung und Mikroskopische…
  • 1971
The spongy structure in medullary cells responsible for the colour of blue barbs in rump feathers of Agapornis roseicollis and… (More)
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