Acutance

Known as: Microcontrast, Accutance, Sharpness (visual) 
In photography, the term "acutance" describes a subjective perception of sharpness that is related to the edge contrast of an image. Acutance is… (More)
Wikipedia

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2017
2017
In this study a new camera testing method is introduced to determine and analyze the autofocus latency of cameras. This analysis… (More)
Is this relevant?
2015
2015
The processing of signal on graphs is becoming an important emerging area that has great potential in a wide variety of… (More)
  • table I
  • figure 1
  • figure 4
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2013
Highly Cited
2013
We provide novel theoretical results regarding local optima of regularized M -estimators, allowing for nonconvexity in both loss… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
2009
2009
The question of quantifying the sharpness (or unsharpness) of a quantum mechanical effect is investigated. Apart from sharpness… (More)
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
We study identification in games with a finite set of pure strategy profiles and multiple equilibria. For concreteness, we focus… (More)
Is this relevant?
2006
2006
In this paper, we propose a new tactile sensor skin ("skin by touch area receptor" or STAR). The skin consists of two components… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2003
2003
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Abstract We offer a theory of economic fluctuations based on intertemporal increasing returns: agents who have been active in the past face lower costs of action today. This specification explains the observed persistence in individual and aggregate output fluctuations even in the presence of i.i.d shocks, because individuals respond to the same shock differently depending on their recent past experience. The exact process for output, the sharpness of turning points and the degree of asymmetry are determined by the form of heterogeneity. Our general formulation, under certain assumptions, reduces to a number of popular state space (unobserved components) models. We find that on U.S. data our general formulation performs better than many of the existing econometric models, largely because it allows sharper downturns and more pronounced asymmetries than linear models, and is smoother than discrete regime shift models. Our estimates imply that only modest intertemporal returns are needed for our model to explain U.S. GNP, and that heterogeneity across agents plays an important role in the propagation of business cycle shocks. 
  • table 1
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Due to the scarcity and high cost of conventional film-based hemispherical photographic systems, some forest scientists are now… (More)
  • table 1
  • figure 1
  • table 2
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
1999
1999
This study investigates the effect of tooth sharpness on the force and energy necessary for a tooth to divide foods of differing… (More)
  • figure 1
  • table 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 4
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Most benign breast tumors possess well-defined, sharp boundaries that delineate them from surrounding tissues, as opposed to… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 4
  • figure 3
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?