ACL2

Known as: ACL, ACL2 theorem prover 
ACL2 (A Computational Logic for Applicative Common Lisp) is a software system consisting of a programming language, an extensible theory in a first… (More)
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Papers overview

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2018
2018
We report on a verification of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra in ACL2(r). The proof consists of four parts. First, continuity… (More)
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2011
2011
In this paper, we describe recent improvements to the theory of differentiation that is formalized in ACL2(r). First, we show how… (More)
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2007
2007
ACL2 is the latest inception of the Boyer-Moore theorem prover, the 2005 recipient of the ACM software system award. In the hands… (More)
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2006
2006
Teaching undergraduates to develop software in a formal framework such as ACL2 poses two immediate challenges. First, students… (More)
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2003
2003
We describe a method for introducing “partial functions” into ACL2, that is, functions not defined everywhere. The function… (More)
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2003
2003
As of version 2.7, the ACL2 theorem prover has been extended to automatically verify sets of polynomial inequalities that include… (More)
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2002
2002
ACL2 is a rst-order applicative programming language based on Common Lisp. It is also a mathematical logic for which a mechanical… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Make more knowledge even in less time every day. You may not always spend your time and money to go abroad and get the experience… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
ACL2 is a reimplemented extended version of Boyer and Moore's Nqthm and Kaufmann's Pc-Nqthm, intended for large scale veriication… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
ACL2 is a mechanized mathematical logic intended for use in specifying and proving properties of computing machines. In two… (More)
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