ABT-639

Known as: T-type Calcium Channel Blocker ABT-639 
An orally bioavailable, CaV3.2 T-type calcium channel blocker with potential anti-hyperalgesic activity. Upon oral administration, ABT-639… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2014-2016
01220142016

Papers overview

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2017
2017
Low-voltage-activated calcium channels are important regulators of neurotransmission and membrane ion conductance. A plethora of… (More)
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2016
2016
OBJECTIVE This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial evaluated the pharmacodynamic effects of a single… (More)
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2015
2015
T-type Cav3.2 calcium channels represent a novel target for neuropathic pain modulation. Preclinical studies with ABT-639, a… (More)
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2015
2015
The discovery of a novel peripherally acting and selective Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel blocker, ABT-639, is described. HTS hits… (More)
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2015
2015
T-type calcium channels are a potential novel target for treatment of neuropathic pain such as painful diabetic neuropathy. ABT… (More)
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2015
2015
ABT-639 is a selective T-type calcium channel blocker with efficacy in a wide range of preclinical models of nociceptive and… (More)
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2014
2014
Activation of T-type Ca²⁺ channels contributes to nociceptive signaling by facilitating action potential bursting and modulation… (More)
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2014
2014
ABT-639 is a selective T-type calcium channel blocker with efficacy in a wide range of preclinical models of nociceptive and… (More)
  • figure 1
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  • table III
  • table IV
Is this relevant?