46XX female genotype

Known as: 46XX, XX Genotype, XX 
The normal genotype of a female human.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
In mammals, female development has traditionally been considered a default process in the absence of the testis-determining gene… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Although the sex-determining gene SRY/Sry has been identified in mammals, homologues and genes that have a similar function have… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
L IKE other endosecretory glands the adrenals have been studied by removing them and by injecting their extracts. Injection… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
In Drosophila melanogaster, seminal fluid proteins influence several components of female physiology and behavior, including re… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Any books that you read, no matter how you got the sentences that have been read from the books, surely they will give you… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Mutation analyses of patients with campomelic dysplasia, a bone dysmorphology and XY sex reversal syndrome, indicate that the SRY… (More)
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Highly Cited
1984
Highly Cited
1984
In humans, XX maleness is the best known example of a sex reversal syndrome occurring with an incidence of one XX male among… (More)
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Highly Cited
1978
Highly Cited
1978
Hydatidiform moles studied with respect to cytogenetics and morphologic constitution were divisible into two syndromes: (1… (More)
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Highly Cited
1976
Highly Cited
1976
THE wood lemming (Myopus schisticolor Lilljeborg), a small rodent inhabiting mossy forests of northern coniferous areas of… (More)
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