uvulopalatopharyngoplasty

Known as: palatopharyngoplasty 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2004
2004
OBJECTIVES Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) is the most common surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Anatomic and… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
OBJECTIVE Early studies by Friedman et al. have demonstrated the value of staging obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
STUDY OBJECTIVES To evaluate the effects of treatment with a dental appliance or uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) on somnographic… (More)
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1995
1995
The objective of this study was to assess the value of preoperative fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy with the Müller maneuver (FNMM… (More)
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1990
1990
Uvulopalatopharygoplasty has become widely performed for chronic snoring and for cases of obstructive sleep apnoea. Unfortunately… (More)
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1990
1990
Reports of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty complications were elicited from 72 locations in the United States. We asked physicians to… (More)
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Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
Although obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been studied in detail for over a decade, the mortality of this disorder is unclear… (More)
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1985
1985
Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP), originally evaluated in 66 patients with objectively documented sleep apnea syndrome, was… (More)
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1985
1985
A new surgical procedure to treat obstructive sleep apnea by uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) was evaluated in 66 patients, 63… (More)
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Highly Cited
1981
Highly Cited
1981
Excessive daytime sleepiness and loud snoring are the major symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea, often leading to serious medical… (More)
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