bromochloroacetic acid

 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2000-2015
012320002015

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2012
2012
  • IARC MONOGRAPHS
  • 2012
Description: Crystalline compound (NTP, 2009) Boiling-point: bp760 215 °C (Weast, 1983) Melting-point: 27.5–31.5 °C (WHO, 2004… (More)
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2011
2011
Bromate (BrO(3)(-)) is a drinking water disinfection by-product (DBP) that induces renal cell death via DNA damage-dependent and… (More)
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2011
2011
An adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay was developed using pluripotent J1 mouse embryonic stem cells… (More)
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2010
2010
The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are formed during the disinfection of drinking water… (More)
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2009
2009
  • National Toxicology Program technical report…
  • 2009
BACKGROUND Bromochloroacetic acid occurs as a by-product of water disinfection. We studied the effects of bromochloroacetic acid… (More)
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2009
2009
Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are a class of byproducts resulting from the reaction of chlorinated disinfectants with natural organic… (More)
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2005
2005
A byproduct of drinking water disinfection, bromochloroacetic acid (BCA), acts as a reproductive toxicant in rats. To determine… (More)
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2002
2002
Disubstituted haloacid by-products of drinking water disinfection such as dibromoacetic acid and dichloroacetic acid have been… (More)
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2002
2002
A symposium was held at the 41st annual meeting of the Society of Toxicology with presentations that emphasized novel molecular… (More)
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2000
2000
Haloacetic acids (HAs) are embryotoxic contaminants commonly found in drinking water. The mechanism of HA embryotoxicity has not… (More)
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