Varicella zoster infection

Known as: Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection, infection varicella zoster, infections varicella zoster 
A highly contagious viral infection caused by the varicella zoster virus. Clinically, it may be manifested as shingles or chicken pox.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2007
Review
2007
Varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection can be serious for pregnant women and their babies, although it is rare. The implications… (More)
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Review
2007
Review
2007
Multiple neurologic complications may follow the reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV), including herpes zoster (also… (More)
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2004
2004
Data of hospitalizations for varicella and herpes zoster in Spain during the 1999-2000 period were obtained from the national… (More)
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2003
2003
We describe a case of encephalitis after primary varicella zoster infection with localised basal ganglia imaging abnormalities… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
BACKGROUND Whether exogenous exposure to varicella-zoster-virus protects individuals with latent varicella-zoster virus infection… (More)
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2000
2000
This multicentre retrospective study describes the clinical features and prognostic significance of Varicella-zoster virus (VZV… (More)
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1998
1998
Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) viremia at different stages of infection was characterized. Different approaches were used… (More)
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1997
1997
This article describes a prospective longitudinal study of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections in human immunodeficiency… (More)
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Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
The cellular immunoincompetence which follows bone marrow transplantation (BMT) allows both primary and reactivation infection… (More)
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Highly Cited
1986
Highly Cited
1986
In a prospective, randomized trial, we compared intravenous acyclovir and vidarabine in the treatment of varicella-zoster virus… (More)
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