VDR protein, human

Known as: 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Receptor, Vitamin D Hormone Receptor, VDR 
Vitamin D3 receptor (427 aa, ~48 kDa) is encoded by the human VDR gene. This protein is involved in vitamin D-mediated transcriptional regulation.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1991-2017
01219912017

Papers overview

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2018
2018
Worldwide, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the major subtype of primary liver cancers. HCC is typically diagnosed late in its… (More)
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2015
2015
The Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and is of therapeutic interest in cancer and other… (More)
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2014
2014
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a range of muscle disorders, including myalgia, muscle weakness, and falls. In humans… (More)
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2014
2014
Colorectal cancer represents the third cancer worldwide. Studies showed that insufficient levels of vitamin D may result in… (More)
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Review
2014
Review
2014
Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) is known to be involved in calcium homeostasis and recently, for its role in cell growth and… (More)
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Review
2013
Review
2013
The current study investigated transcriptional distortion in prostate cancer cells using the vitamin D receptor (VDR) as a tool… (More)
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2011
2011
The vitamin D(3) receptor (VDR) serves as a negative growth regulator during mammary gland development via suppression of… (More)
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2010
2010
Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) is expressed in both animal and human ovarian tissue, however, the role of vitamin D in human ovarian… (More)
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2009
2009
BACKGROUND & AIMS Vitamin D receptor (VDR)-knockout mice develop severe hypocalcemia and rickets, accompanied by disruption of… (More)
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