Tumor Expansion

Growth of a tumor involving either an increase in size of a continuous tumor tissue mass or translocation of tumor cells to secondary sites. (NCI)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2015
Highly Cited
2015
Grade II and III gliomas are generally slowly progressing brain cancers, many of which eventually transform into more aggressive… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Diffuse infiltration of glioma cells into normal brain tissue is considered to be a main reason for the unfavorable outcomes of… (More)
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Review
2008
Review
2008
The vast majority of primary brain tumors derive from glial cells and are collectively called gliomas. While, they share some… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are widely used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and autoimmune diseases. Although the… (More)
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Review
2006
Review
2006
Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly malignant, rapidly progressive astrocytoma that is distinguished pathologically from lower grade… (More)
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Review
2002
Review
2002
Tumor-stroma interactions play a significant role in tumor development and progression. Alterations in the stromal… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
In glioblastoma-derived cell lines, PTEN does not significantly alter apoptotic sensitivity or cause complete inhibition of DNA… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an essential regulator of vascularization. It is expressed as several splice… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
There is considerable controversy concerning the importance of tumor-derived angiogenic factors to the neovascularization of… (More)
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Review
1995
Review
1995
The growth of solid tumors to a clinically relevant size is dependent upon an adequate blood supply. This is achieved by the… (More)
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