Thlaspi arvense

Known as: Thlaspi arvenses, arvenses, Thlaspi 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2014
2014
BackgroundThe ethnobotany of Tibetans is a seriously under-studied topic. The aim of the study was to investigate knowledge and… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2011
2011
We examined recruitment, survival, life cycle and fecundity of two metallicolous (M, on metalliferous calamine soils) and two non… Expand
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • figure 2
  • table 3
  • figure 3
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
Efficient root-to-shoot translocation is a key trait of the zinc/cadmium hyperaccumulators Thlaspi caerulescens and Thlaspi… Expand
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
Thlaspi praecox Wulfen (Brassicaceae) is a perennial Cd/Zn hyperaccumulating plant species that forms functional arbuscular… Expand
  • table 1
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 3
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
  • Silva Sonjak, Thierry Beguiristain, Corinne Leyval, Marjana Regvar
  • Plant and Soil
  • 2008
Some plants are more mycorrhizal than others and mycorrhizal colonisation of plants in extreme environments is frequently… Expand
  • table 1
  • figure 1
  • table 2
Is this relevant?
2006
2006
The response of plant communities to pollution associated with the lead smelter in Zerjav, Slovenia, was investigated on spatial… Expand
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
The plants Salix viminalis L. (common osier) and Thlaspi caerulescens J. Presl & C. Presl have been studied often because of… Expand
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Abstract.Thlaspi caerulescens (J. & C. Presl, "Prayon") is a heavy-metal hyperaccumulator that accumulates Zn and Cd to high… Expand
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Thlaspi caerulescens (J. and C. Presl) and Thlaspi ochroleucum (Boiss. ex Heldr) were grown in three different soils containing… Expand
  • table 1
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?