Surgical Sponges

Known as: Sponge, Surgical, Sponges, Surgical, Surgical Sponge 
Gauze material used to absorb body fluids during surgery. Referred to as GOSSYPIBOMA if accidentally retained in the body following surgery.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2007
2007
Use of gauze sponges that have been embedded with passive radio frequency identification (RFID) tags presents a high probability… (More)
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2006
2006
Postoperative retained surgical sponges or other foreign bodies are usually underreported. Radio-opaque materials are usually… (More)
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2005
2005
BACKGROUND The inadvertent "loss" of surgical sponges, towels, and instruments remains an unsolved problem. The means of… (More)
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2005
2005
The objective of this study was to present the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management for 14 cases of… (More)
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Review
1999
Review
1999
Retention of surgical sponges is rare. They cause either an aseptic reaction without significant symptoms or an exudative… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
PURPOSE Our goal was to demonstrate possible pitfalls in the CT diagnosis of retained surgical sponges (textilomas) and to… (More)
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1992
1992
The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of sponges retained postsurgically in three patients are described. MRI depicted… (More)
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Highly Cited
1990
Highly Cited
1990
The surgical sponge retained following intra-abdominal surgery is a continuing problem. Despite precautions, the incidence of… (More)
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1987
1987
The computed tomographic (CT) and ultrasonographic (US) appearances of retained surgical sponges are described. In each case, the… (More)
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Highly Cited
1982
Highly Cited
1982
Retained surgical sponge is an infrequently reported condition that may be recognized incidentally during the early postoperative… (More)
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