Structure of plantar calcaneonavicular ligament

Known as: Lig. calcaneonaviculare plantare, Spring ligament, Plantar calcaneonavicular ligament 
 
National Institutes of Health

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Topic mentions per year

2010-2017
024620102017

Papers overview

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2017
2017
INTRODUCTION The spring ligament (SL) is increasingly recognised as the major structure that fails in acquired adult flatfoot… (More)
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2017
2017
BACKGROUND It is usually accepted that acquired flatfoot deformity after injury is usually due to partial or complete tear of the… (More)
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Review
2017
Review
2017
The spring ligament complex is an important static restraint of the medial longitudinal arch of the foot and its failure has been… (More)
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Review
2017
Review
2017
  • Julia Crim
  • Magnetic resonance imaging clinics of North…
  • 2017
Abnormalities of the medial ligaments and posterior tibial tendon can occur because of acute injury or chronic instability or… (More)
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2015
2015
INTRODUCTION The spring (calcaneonavicular) ligament is an intricate multiligament complex whose primary role is to stabilise the… (More)
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2014
2014
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and lesions of diverse ankle structures diagnosed at… (More)
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2013
2013
The calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament complex is a critical static support of the medial arch of the foot. Compromise of this… (More)
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2013
2013
BACKGROUND Adult-acquired flatfoot deformity is usually secondary to failure of the tibialis posterior tendon, with secondary… (More)
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2010
2010
The plantar fascia (PF) and major ligaments play important roles in keeping the static foot arch structure. Their functions and… (More)
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