Strong perfect graph theorem

Known as: Strong perfect graph conjecture 
In graph theory, the strong perfect graph theorem is a forbidden graph characterization of the perfect graphs as being exactly the graphs that have… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

1974-2018
024619742018

Papers overview

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2016
2016
In 1960 Berge came up with the concept of perfect graphs, and in doing so, conjectured some characteristics about them. A perfect… (More)
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2009
2009
Efficiently finding the maximum a posteriori (MAP) configuration of a graphical model is an important problem which is often… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
A graph is Berge if no induced subgraph of G is an odd cycle of length at least five or the complement of one. In this paper we… (More)
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2002
2002
A graph is perfect if, in all its induced subgraphs, the size of a largest clique is equal to the chromatic number. Examples of… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
A graph G is perfect if for every induced subgraph H, the chromatic number of H equals the size of the largest complete subgraph… (More)
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2000
2000
A graph G is called Berge if neither G nor its complement contains a chordless cycle whose length is odd and at least five; what… (More)
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1996
1996
We will characterize all graphs that have the property that the graph and its complement are minimal even pair free. This… (More)
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1992
1992
We give various reformulations of the Strong Perfect Graph Conjecture, based on a study of forced coloring procedures, uniquely… (More)
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1981
1981
In what follows, we assume that our graphs are finite without loops or multiple edges. We define w(G) to be the size of the… (More)
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1979
1979
Our graphs are “Michigan” except that they have vertices and edges rather than points and lines. If G is a graph, then y1 = y1 (G… (More)
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