Stage 0is Renal Pelvis Urothelial Carcinoma

Known as: Stage 0is Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis, Stage 0is Renal Pelvis Urothelial Carcinoma AJCC v7, Carcinoma in situ of Kidney Pelvis 
Stage 0is includes: Tis, N0, M0. Tis: Carcinoma in situ. N0: No regional lymph node metastasis. M0: No distant metastasis. (AJCC 7th ed.)
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1950-2017
02419502016

Papers overview

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2012
2012
Wir berichten über einen 67-jährigen dialysepflichtigen Patienten mit schmerzloser Makrohämaturie und PSA-Erhöhung. In der… (More)
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2010
2010
PURPOSE To compare biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
OBJECTIVES Hypoxia and high interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) have been shown to independently predict for nodal and distant… (More)
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Review
1994
Review
1994
A 71-year-old female presented with left back pain at our hospital. She had had the same symptom about 1 year previously, but she… (More)
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1989
1989
Primary transitional cell carcinoma in situ of the renal pelvis is usually found in association with ureteral or vesical… (More)
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1989
1989
Retrospective evaluation of the osseous pelvis in 93 patients with severe diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH… (More)
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1985
1985
The first long-term remission of high grade, flat carcinoma in situ of the renal pelvis treated with topical bacillus Calmette… (More)
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1983
1983
Significant metastatic lesions of the osseous pelvis can be easily missed by conventional x-ray studies. Although the… (More)
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1979
1979
Computed tomography (CT) was used for study of the osseous pelvis in 43 patients with definitive pathological or clinical follow… (More)
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1977
1977
A case of carcinoma in situ of the renal pelvis, diagnosed by exfoliative cytology from ureteral specimens and treated by… (More)
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