Soar (cognitive architecture)

Known as: Soar 
Soar is a cognitive architecture, created by John Laird, Allen Newell, and Paul Rosenbloom at Carnegie Mellon University. (Rosenbloom continued to… (More)
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2012
2012
Our long-term goal is to develop autonomous robotic systems that have the cognitive abilities of humans, including communication… (More)
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Highly Cited
2012
Highly Cited
2012
 
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2009
2009
This paper describes the development of a system that uses computational psychology (the Soar cognitive architecture) for the… (More)
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2009
2009
Cognitive architectures aspire for generality both in terms of problem solving and learning across a range of problems, yet to… (More)
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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
One approach in pursuit of general intelligent agents has been to concentrate on the underlying cognitive architecture, of which… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
In this paper, we describe an architectural modification to Soar that gives a Soar agent the opportunity to learn statistical… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Cognitive modeling has evolved into a powerful tool for understanding and predicting user behavior. Higher-level modeling… (More)
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1999
1999
(3) Soar does not currently include any capacity limits on its dynamic memory (SDM), but is compatible with certain such… (More)
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Highly Cited
1991
Highly Cited
1991
Rosenbloom, P.S., J.E. Laird, A. Newell and R. McCarl, A primary analysis of the Soar architecture as a basis for general… (More)
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Highly Cited
1986
Highly Cited
1986
In this article we describe an approach to the construction of a general learning mechanism based on chunking in Soar. Chunking… (More)
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