SNORD115@ gene cluster

Known as: HBII-52, SNORD115@, small nucleolar RNA, C/D box 115 cluster 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2001-2015
012320012015

Papers overview

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2015
2015
Pediatric high-grade gliomas (HGGs) are highly malignant tumors that remain incurable and relatively understudied. The crucial… (More)
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2009
2009
HBII-52 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are brain-expressed posttranscriptional modifiers of serotonin receptor 2C RNA. They are… (More)
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2008
2008
HBII-52 is a human brain-specific C/D box snoRNA that potentially regulates the editing and/or alternative splicing of the… (More)
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2008
2008
Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) play a significant role in Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) and Angelman Syndrome (AS), which are… (More)
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2008
2008
Among thousands of non-protein-coding RNAs which have been found in humans, a significant group represents snoRNA molecules that… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
The Prader-Willi syndrome is a congenital disease that is caused by the loss of paternal gene expression from a maternally… (More)
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Review
2006
Review
2006
The SNURF-SNRPN locus located on chromosome 15 is maternally imprinted and generates a large transcript containing at least 148… (More)
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2004
2004
Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct neurogenetic disorders caused by the loss of function of… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
The imprinted domain on human chromosome 15 consists of two oppositely imprinted gene clusters, which are under the coordinated… (More)
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