Rose Bengal

Known as: Bengal, Rose, Rose Bengal [Chemical/Ingredient], bengal rose staining 
A bright bluish pink compound that has been used as a dye, biological stain, and diagnostic aid.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis affecting livestock and human beings. The human disease lacks pathognomonic symptoms… (More)
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2008
2008
To study the effects of intralesional Rose Bengal for chemoablation of metastatic melanoma. Twenty-six target lesions in 11… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
The aim of the present study was to analyse the diagnostic yield of the rose Bengal test for the rapid diagnosis of human… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Thanks to Eric Verhoogen, James Heintz, Stephanie Eckman, Nicole Huber, and Melissa Osborne for research assistance, to the… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
OBJECTIVE To describe the epidemiology of dry eye in the adult population of Melbourne, Australia. DESIGN A cross-sectional… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
PURPOSE This study was designed to compare goblet cell densities and mucosal epithelial membrane mucin (MEM) expression in… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
PURPOSE To study the demographics and estimate the prevalence of dry eye among elderly Americans. METHODS A population-based… (More)
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Highly Cited
1992
Highly Cited
1992
It has been believed that 1% rose bengal does not stain normal, healthy cells but rather stains degenerated or dead cells and… (More)
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1992
1992
The authors have recently reported that rose bengal is not a vital dye, and stains whenever the cultured cells are not covered by… (More)
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Highly Cited
1985
Highly Cited
1985
We have used a photochemical reaction in vivo to induce reproducible thrombosis leading to cerebral infarction in rats. After the… (More)
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