Ring signature

In cryptography, a ring signature is a type of digital signature that can be performed by any member of a group of users that each have keys… (More)
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Papers overview

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2007
2007
In this paper, we propose a new notion called Certificate Based Ring Signature (CBRS) that follows the idea of Certificate Based… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Ring signatures, first introduced by Rivest, Shamir, and Tauman, enable a user to sign a message so that a ring of possible… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
We describe the first efficient ring signature scheme secure, without random oracles, based on standard assumptions. Our ring… (More)
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2004
Highly Cited
2004
Identity-based (ID-based) cryptosystems eliminate the need for validity checking of the certificates and the need for registering… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
In Asiacrypt2001, Boneh, Lynn, and Shacham [8] proposed a short signature scheme (BLS scheme) using bilinear pairing on certain… (More)
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2004
2004
In threshold ring signature schemes, any group of t entities spontaneously conscript arbitrarily n − t entities to generate a… (More)
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2004
2004
Identity-based (ID-based) cryptosystems avoid the necessity of certificates to authenticate public keys in a digital… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Recently the bilinear pairing such as Weil pairing or Tate pairing on elliptic curves and hyperelliptic curves have been found… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
An aggregate signature scheme is a digital signature that supports aggregation: Given n signatures on n distinct messages from n… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
In this paper, we investigate the recent paradigm for group signatures proposed by Rivest et al . at Asiacrypt ’01. We first… (More)
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