Recessus epitympanicus structure

Known as: Attic, Recessus epitympanicus, Epitympanic recess 
A hollow area in the upper portion of the tympanic cavity.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2010
2010
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS Although middle ear aeration is certainly related to eustachian tube (ET) function, other anatomic factors… (More)
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2010
2010
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the efficiency of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-resolution computed… (More)
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2009
2009
CONCLUSION The endoscopic approach to attic cholesteatoma allows clear observation of the tensor fold area and consequently… (More)
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2007
2007
BACKGROUND There are no universally accepted opinions about the choice of surgical technique and outcome of surgery for… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
OBJECTIVES Microscopic postauricular tympanomastoidectomy provides a limited exposure to the attic, especially anteriorly. In… (More)
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2000
2000
OBJECTIVE The aim of the current study was to provide support for a combination of the retraction and proliferation theories of… (More)
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1994
1994
Two hundred and twenty two children with persistent bilateral otitis media with effusion (OME) were treated with unilateral… (More)
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1993
1993
Endoscopic mastoidoscopy is ideally suited for patients who have undergone an intact canal wall mastoidectomy for primary… (More)
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1992
1992
Since Utech's introduction of cartilage as a columella in ear surgery in 1969, we have used tragal and conchal autografts for… (More)
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1987
1987
The atelectatic retraction pocket (ARP) has been implicated in the development of chronic otitis media and cholesteatoma. The ARP… (More)
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