RPTOR gene

Known as: RAPTOR, RPTOR, REGULATORY ASSOCIATED PROTEIN OF MTOR 
This gene is involved in regulating cell growth.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1995-2018
051019952018

Papers overview

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2016
2016
DNA methylation changes in peripheral blood DNA have been shown to be associated with solid tumors. We sought to identify… (More)
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2015
2015
The target of rapamycin complex I (TORC1) regulates cell growth and metabolism in eukaryotes. Previous studies have shown that… (More)
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2014
2014
The activation of mTOR signaling is necessary for mechanically-induced changes in skeletal muscle mass, but the mechanisms that… (More)
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2014
2014
Much of the mammalian skeleton is derived from a cartilage template that undergoes rapid growth during embryogenesis, but the… (More)
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2013
2013
Here we report that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) mediates plumbagin-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition… (More)
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2013
2013
Psoriasis vulgaris is a genetically heterogenous disease with unclear molecular background. We assessed the association of… (More)
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2008
2008
The target of rapamycin (Tor) protein plays central roles in cell growth. Rapamycin inhibits cell growth and promotes cell cycle… (More)
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2007
2007
The target of rapamycin (TOR) is a large (281 kDa) conserved Ser/Thr protein kinase that functions as a central controller of… (More)
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2005
2005
The RAPTOR/KOG1 proteins are binding partners of the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that is present in all eucaryotes and plays… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
The target of rapamycin (TOR) proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TOR1 and TOR2, redundantly regulate growth in a rapamycin… (More)
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