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RH 5849

Known as: RH-5849 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2008
2008
The comparative toxicity of two non-steroidal ecdysteroid agonists, RH-2485 and RH-5992 (tebufenozide), on development stages… Expand
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
A combined approach employing comet assay and micronucleus (MN) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) tests was utilized to assess… Expand
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Sublethal concentrations of the bisacylhydrazine moulting hormone agonists, RH-5849, and tebufenozide (RH-5992) were fed to sixth… Expand
2002
2002
We have investigated the biologically active conformation of the non-steroidal ecdysone agonist, 1-tert-butyl-1,2… Expand
Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
In this paper, several studies were conducted to evaluate the genotoxicity of two pesticides, Imidacloprid and RH-5849, for… Expand
1997
1997
Molting in insects is regulated by molting hormones (ecdysteroids). The major active hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone, is formed by… Expand
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Review
1996
Review
1996
Ion channels are the primary target sites for several classes of natural and synthetic insecticidal compounds. The voltage… Expand
1991
1991
RH 5849 competes with 3H-ponasterone A for ecdysteroid binding sites in Chironomus tentans cells with an about fourfold lower… Expand
Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
The ecdysone agonist RH 5849 (1,2-dibenzoyl-1-tert-butylhydrazine) causes the premature initiation of molting at all stages of… Expand
Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
The steroid molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone is the physiological inducer of molting and metamorphosis in insects. In ecdysone… Expand