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Pseudorasbora parva

Known as: Leuciscus parvus 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2018
2018
Species translocation leads to disease emergence in native species of considerable economic importance. Generalist parasites are… Expand
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2017
2017
The introduction of non-native species can lead to the introduction of non-native parasites to their introduced range which can… Expand
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2017
2017
Non-native species are often linked to the introduction of novel pathogens with detrimental effects on native biodiversity. Since… Expand
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2016
2016
Abstract In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Pseudorasbora parva (Cyprinidae: Gobioninae) was determined. The… Expand
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2015
2015
Recent years have seen a global and rapid resurgence of fungal diseases with direct impact on biodiversity and local extinctions… Expand
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2014
2014
AbstractBiological invasions caused by accidental introductions often result in severe ecological impact. Revealing the pattern… Expand
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2011
2011
The Asiatic topmouth gudgeon, Pseudorasbora parva, is recognized as one of the most invasive fish species in many countries… Expand
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2010
2010
Data on new finds of topmouth gudgeon Pseudorasbora parva in the European part of Russia in Don and Manych river basins are… Expand
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2009
2009
The topmouth gudgeon, Pseudorasbora parva, originating from eastern Asia, was accidentally introduced in European waters (1961… Expand
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2005
2005
Topmouth gudgeon, Pseudorasbora parva (Temminck and Schlegel), is a small cyprinid (maximum recorded: 110 mm fork length; Cakic… Expand
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