Prognathodes aculeatus

Known as: Chaetodon aculeatus, Chelmon aculeatus, Prognathodes aya aculeatus 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
Natural selection is expected to leave an imprint on the neutral polymorphisms at the adjacent genomic regions of a selected gene… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
REIMCHEN, T. E. 1980. Spine deficiency and polymorphism in a population of Gasterosteus aculeatus: an adaptation to predators… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Historically, six small lakes in southwestern British Columbia each contained a sympatric species pair of three-spined… (More)
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Review
2005
Review
2005
In this study, the more significant results of extensive ethnopharmacobotanical research carried out by the author in the years… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Most adaptation is thought to occur through the fixation of numerous alleles at many different loci. Consequently, the… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Theoretical and empirical studies suggest that an optimal resistance to pathogens and parasites requires an optimal number of… (More)
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Highly Cited
1993
Highly Cited
1993
A necessary condition of most models of intersexual selection requires that secondary sexual traits are costly so that cheating… (More)
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Highly Cited
1989
Highly Cited
1989
Loss of conspicuous nuptial color in Gasterosteus aculeatus (threespine stickleback) has been reported from several localities in… (More)
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Highly Cited
1978
Highly Cited
1978
ACCORDING to the principle of natural selection, each individual animal is assumed to maximise its inclusive fitness1. Thus… (More)
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Highly Cited
1972