Preanesthetic Medication

Known as: Medication, Preanesthetic, Medications, Preanesthetic, Preanesthetic Medications 
Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2015
2015
INTRODUCTION The preoperative period is a stressing occurrence for most people undergoing surgery, in particular children… (More)
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2011
2011
BACKGROUND Relieving preoperative anxiety is an important concern for the pediatric anesthesiologist. Midazolam has become the… (More)
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2001
2001
UNLABELLED We compared the effects of oral clonidine (4 microg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) on the preanesthetic sedation and… (More)
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1995
1995
BACKGROUND The perfect preanesthesia medication and its ideal route of administration are still debated, but for pediatric… (More)
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Highly Cited
1992
Highly Cited
1992
The authors sought to define a dose of oral ketamine that would facilitate induction of anesthesia without causing significant… (More)
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Review
1992
Review
1992
In a recent editorial, Kapur described perioperative nausea and vomiting as "the big 'little problem' following ambulatory… (More)
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Highly Cited
1990
Highly Cited
1990
A need exists for a safe and effective oral preanesthetic medication for use in children undergoing elective surgical procedures… (More)
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1989
1989
Initial studies have suggested that oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) in a dose of 15-20 micrograms/kg may be a safe and… (More)
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1989
1989
The child's fear of injections coupled with the concern that the psychologic advantage of intramuscular premedication may be all… (More)
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1975
1975
The incidence of heart-rate slowing (greater than 15 percent) and junctional rhythm after two injections of succinylcholine (1 mg… (More)
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