Polynomial long division

Known as: Division transformation, Polynomial division, Polynomial division algorithm 
In algebra, polynomial long division is an algorithm for dividing a polynomial by another polynomial of the same or lower degree, a generalised… (More)
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2011
2011
The purpose of this paper is to initiate a new attack on Arveson’s resistant conjecture, that all graded submodules of the d… (More)
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2011
2011
In 1974, Johnson showed how to multiply and divide sparse polynomials using a binary heap. This paper introduces a new algorithm… (More)
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2010
2010
We present a parallel algorithm for exact division of sparse distributed polynomials on a multicore processor. This is a problem… (More)
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2007
2007
A common way of implementing multivariate polynomial multiplication and division is to represent polynomials as linked lists of… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Conway and Smith’s book is a wonderful introduction to the normed division algebras: the real numbers (R), the complex numbers (C… (More)
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1997
1997
 In this paper we revisit an algorithm presented by Chen, Reed, Helleseth, and Troung in [5] for decoding cyclic codes up to… (More)
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Highly Cited
1987
Highly Cited
1987
A Threshold Circuit consists of an acyclic digraph of unbounded fanin, where each node computes a threshold function or its… (More)
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1986
1986
(i) First we show that all the known algorithms for polynomial division can be represented as algorithms for triangular Toeplitz… (More)
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1985
1985
In this correspondence we show how long division of polynomials can be performed in a pipelined fashion on a linear systolic… (More)
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Highly Cited
1967
Highly Cited
1967
Let @@@@ be an integral domain, P(@@@@) the integral domain of polynomials over @@@@. Let <italic>P</italic>, <italic>Q</italic… (More)
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