Phytolacca dodecandra

Known as: Endod, Phytolacca dodecandras, Endods 
A plant species of the family PHYTOLACCACEAE. The root has been used in traditional medicine and contains SAPONINS used to poison SNAILS.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2008
2008
In this study, we evaluated the toxicity effectiveness of berries crude extract of Endod [vernacular name (local native language… (More)
  • table I
  • figure 1
  • table II
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
OBJECTIVES To record the effect of Endod soap and spraying of soaked Endod suspension on the prevalence of human schistosomiasis… (More)
  • table 1
  • table 2
Is this relevant?
2000
2000
The biodegradability of water-extracted saponins of berries from the Endod plant, Phytolacca dodecandra L'Herit, was evaluated… (More)
Is this relevant?
2000
2000
The extent of genetic differentiation among 17 Ethiopian populations (249 individuals) of Phytolacca dodecandra (Endod) sampled… (More)
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
1998
1998
Aqueous extract of ground Endod (Phytolacca dodecandra) berries (Type 44) was investigated for its cercariacidal and… (More)
Is this relevant?
1990
1990
A procedure for micropropagation of endod (Phytolacca dodecandra) is described. BA at 0.44 μM produced 3.1 new shoots per expiant… (More)
  • table 2
  • table 3
  • figure I
Is this relevant?
1989
1989
Phytolacca dodecandra (L'Herit) grown in cell cultures was investigated for content of ribosome-inhibiting proteins, which was… (More)
Is this relevant?
1984
1984
Dodecandrin, a newly discovered ribosome-inhibiting protein, has been isolated and purified from the leaves of the African endod… (More)
Is this relevant?
1983
1983
Control of Schistosoma mansoni transmission in a town in northern Ethiopia was attempted using the natural product, endod… (More)
Is this relevant?
1970
1970
Dried berries of endod (Phytolacca dodecandra) (known also as soapberry) are widely used in Ethiopia instead of soap for… (More)
Is this relevant?