Phenomenal concept strategy

Known as: Phenomenal concepts strategy 
The phenomenal concept strategy (PCS) is an approach within philosophy of mind to provide a physicalist response to anti-physicalist arguments like… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2001-2017
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Papers overview

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2015
2015
Contemporary phenomenal externalists are motivated to a large extent by the transparency of experience and by the related… (More)
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2013
2013
Perception is a source of knowledge: by looking at a white cup on a desk, one can come to know that there is a white cup on a… (More)
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2011
2011
According to intentionalism the phenomenal character (“what it’s like”) of a conscious experience is determined wholly by its… (More)
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2010
2010
It would be a mistake to deny commonsense intuitions a role in developing a theory of consciousness. However, philosophers have… (More)
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2009
2009
In this paper I respond to a family of objections seeking to show that the phenomenal concept strategy must fail. Roughly, the… (More)
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2007
2007
  • Benj Hellie
  • 2007
The central focus of this article is on a doctrine in the philosophy of perceptual consciousness I call Phenomenal Naivete, and a… (More)
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2007
2007
It is one thing to have phenomenal states and another thing to think about phenomenal states. Thinking about phenomenal states… (More)
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2006
2006
A powerful reply to a range of familiar anti-physicalist arguments has recently been developed. According to this reply, our… (More)
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2006
2006
Confronted with the apparent explanatory gap between physical processes and consciousness, philosophers have reacted in many… (More)
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2006
2006
A prevailing view in contemporary philosophy of mind is that zombies are logically possible. I argue, via a thought experiment… (More)
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