Peter Kollman

Peter Andrew Kollman (Iowa City, July 24, 1944 – San Francisco, May 25, 2001) was a professor of chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry at the… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

1998-2014
0119982014

Papers overview

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2015
2015
The Thole induced point dipole model is combined with three different point charge fitting methods, Merz-Kollman (MK), charges… (More)
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2014
2014
In a first step toward the development of an efficient and accurate protocol to estimate amino acids' pKa's in proteins, we… (More)
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2009
2009
The electronegativity equalization method (EEM) was developed by Mortier et al. as a semiempirical method based on the density… (More)
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2008
Review
2008
Mark J. Emkjer (MJE, pictured) is president and CEO of Accelrys, Inc. He has more than twenty-five years of management experience… (More)
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2006
2006
The variation of atomic charges upon proton transfer in hydrogen bonding complexes of 4-methylimidazole, in both neutral and… (More)
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2005
2005
The charge distribution in the water molecule has been analyzed using a broad variety of basis sets, four different quantum… (More)
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2002
2002
A feature of Peter Kollman's research was his exploitation of the latest computational techniques to devise novel applications of… (More)
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Review
2002
Review
2002
NATURE REVIEWS | DRUG DISCOVERY VOLUME 1 | FEBRUARY 2002 | 97 Protease inhibitors are a key part of many treatment regimes for… (More)
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2001
2001
 
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1998
1998
Four methods for deriving partial atomic charges from the Ž quantum chemical electrostatic potential CHELP, CHELPG, Merz-Kollman… (More)
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