Perceptual Defense

Known as: Defense, Perceptual, Defenses, Perceptual 
Selective perceiving such that the individual protects himself from becoming aware of something unpleasant or threatening, e.g., obscene words are… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1948-2013
024619482012

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
This paper argues that thought is a necessary condition of emotion. It therefore opposes the •stance taken by Zajonc, which… (More)
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2005
2005
This paper is intended to lend support to the 2003 findings of Poloni, Riquier, Zimmermann, and Borgeat. Further, some extensions… (More)
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2003
2003
Prior research by MacLeod and Rutherford (1992) indicates that anxious subjects could have perceptual strategies different from… (More)
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1997
1997
The presentation times (milliseconds on a computer screen followed by a masking grid) required for the correct identification of… (More)
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1996
1996
Perceptual defense as a phenomenon was proposed by McGinnies in 1949. His findings were, in main, replicated by York, et al. in… (More)
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1995
1995
We examined whether habitual defense and coping affect the response of hormones (ACTH. cortisol, prolactin. endorphins, and… (More)
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Highly Cited
1991
Highly Cited
1991
One of the functions of automatic stimulus evaluation is to direct attention toward events that may have undesirable consequences… (More)
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1980
1980
In a tachistoscopic experiment employing a lexical-decision task, it was demonstrated that emotional ("taboo") words are not… (More)
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Highly Cited
1974
Highly Cited
1974
 
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Highly Cited
1949
Highly Cited
1949
During the past decade, a number of experimental investigations have progressively revealed the so-called "dynamic," or… (More)
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