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Pathological fracture

Known as: Fractures, Pathological, Pathologic Fractures, Fractures, Spontaneous 
Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2010
Highly Cited
2010
See related commentary by Kanis, page [1829][1] Since the publication of the Osteoporosis Canada guidelines in 2002, there has… 
Review
2006
Review
2002
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
CONTEXT Vertebral fractures significantly increase lifetime risk of future fractures, but risk of further vertebral fractures in… 
Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Abstract: The purpose of this randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study was to determine the efficacy and safety of… 
Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1995
Highly Cited
1995
BACKGROUND Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a serious health problem, and additional treatments are needed. METHODS We studied… 
Highly Cited
1989
Highly Cited
1989
  • H. Mirels
  • Clinical orthopaedics and related research
  • 1989
  • Corpus ID: 43255503
A weighted scoring system is proposed to quantify the risk of sustaining a pathologic fracture through a metastatic lesion in a…