Paralytic lagophthalmos

A type of lagophthalmos that occurs in association with facial nerve palsy. []
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1966-2017
0519662017

Papers overview

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2014
2014
For the definitive treatment of lagophthalmos and satisfactory rehabilitation of the affected eye, different surgical strategies… (More)
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2013
2013
BACKGROUND Left untreated, paralytic lagophthalmos may result in corneal dryness, ulcerations, and subsequent blindness. The most… (More)
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2009
2009
Lagophthalmos secondary to facial nerve damage can lead to corneal exposure and eventually blindness. Appropriate management… (More)
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2009
2009
PURPOSE To evaluate the safety and efficacy of injecting hyaluronic acid gel in the upper eyelid as a nonsurgical alternative in… (More)
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2009
2009
Temporalis muscle transfer for paralytic lagophthalmos, which was first proposed by Gillies and later developed by Andersen, has… (More)
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2008
2008
UNLABELLED Gold eyelid implantation is widely considered the procedure of choice to reanimate the upper eyelid in paralytic… (More)
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2007
2007
Long-standing facial paralysis is frequently seen in patients who have undergone surgical procedures with sacrifice of the facial… (More)
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2003
2003
Paralytic lagophthalmos has an negative effect on patient. A patient's appearance is grossly distorted and many ocular problems… (More)
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1996
1996
A modified gold-weight implantation technique was used to treat paralytic lagophthalmos in 15 patients. Three patients had… (More)
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1991
1991
Facial nerve paralysis with orbicularis muscle palsy can result in serious corneal complications, such as exposure, ulceration… (More)
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