PLAGL1 gene

Known as: LOT1, PLAGL1, ZAC TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENE 
This gene plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of cellular proliferation and is a tumor suppressor.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2015
Highly Cited
2015
Background:Several epidemiologic studies have demonstrated associations between periconceptional environmental exposures and… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon restricting gene expression in a manner dependent on parent of origin. Imprinted… (More)
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2007
2007
AIM To evaluate the methylation status of CDH1, FHIT, MTAP and PLAGL1 promoters and the association of these findings with… (More)
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2007
2007
The tumour suppressor gene ZAC/PLAGL1 is widely expressed in many human tissues during fetal development and throughout life. It… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
To identify novel methylation-silenced genes in gastric cancers, we carried out a chemical genomic screening, a genome-wide… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism of regulation that restrains the expression of a small subset of mammalian genes to… (More)
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2003
2003
LOT1 is a zinc-finger nuclear transcription factor, which possesses anti-proliferative effects and is frequently silenced in… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
In mammals, the superfamily of "Cys loop," ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), is assembled from a pool of more than 40 homologous… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
We describe a screen for new imprinted human genes, and the identification in this way of ZAC (zinc finger protein which… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Imprinted genes are expressed from one allele according to their parent of origin, and many are essential to mammalian… (More)
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