PCK1 gene

Known as: PEPCKC, PCK1, PEPCK1 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Highly Cited
2015
Highly Cited
2015
Activated T cells engage aerobic glycolysis and anabolic metabolism for growth, proliferation, and effector functions. We propose… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2013
2013
Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are commonly used for industrial production of recombinant proteins in fed batch or alternative… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
Identification of new criteria for embryo quality is required to improve the clinical outcome of in vitro fertilization. The aim… (More)
  • table I
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • table II
Is this relevant?
2007
2007
Epidemiological evidence supports the existence of a possible link between type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and late-onset… (More)
Is this relevant?
Review
2004
Review
2004
Genetics and diet interact to cause type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. PCK1 has been implicated as one of many genes… (More)
Is this relevant?
2004
2004
We sequenced the promoter and coding regions of PCK1 encoding cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from genomic DNA of… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Arabidopsis thaliana is used as a model system to study triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation and seed germination in oilseeds. Here… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
1997
1997
The PCK1 gene encoding PEP carboxykinase (Pck1) of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans was isolated and sequenced. The deduced… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1995
Highly Cited
1995
Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is expressed at high levels in liver, kidney, and adipose tissue. This enzyme catalyzes… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 6
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1993
Highly Cited
1993
The PKC1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a homolog of mammalian protein kinase C that is required for normal growth and… (More)
Is this relevant?