O 1602

Known as: O-1602, O1602 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2007-2017
024620072017

Papers overview

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2013
2013
OBJECTIVES The anti-inflammatory effects of O-1602 and cannabidiol (CBD), the ligands of G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55… (More)
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2013
2013
OBJECTIVE The G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is a novel cannabinoid (CB) receptor, whose role in the gastrointestinal (GI… (More)
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2012
2012
AIMS Cannabinoids are known to control energy homeostasis. Atypical cannabinoids produce pharmacological effects via unidentified… (More)
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2012
2012
Cannabinoids have antiinflammatory and antitumorigenic properties. Some cannabinoids, such as O-1602, have no or only little… (More)
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2011
2011
BACKGROUND Cannabinoids are known to reduce intestinal inflammation. Atypical cannabinoids produce pharmacological effects via… (More)
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2011
2011
Cannabinoids classically act via CB₁ and CB₂ receptors to modulate nociception; however, recent findings suggest that some… (More)
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2011
2011
The cannabinoid CB1 receptor is a well-known player in energy homeostasis and its specific antagonism has been used in clinical… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
GPR55 is a G protein-coupled receptor recently shown to be activated by certain cannabinoids and by lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI… (More)
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2008
2008
Here, we show a novel pharmacology for inhibition of human neutrophil migration by endocannabinoids, phytocannabinoids, and… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Atypical cannabinoids are thought to cause vasodilatation through an as-yet unidentified 'CBx' receptor… (More)
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